Saturday, July 02, 2016 TOP

Topic

A research achievement by Assistant Professor Dr. Harutoshi Asakawa of the Graduate School of Sciences and Technology for Innovation has been published in Nature Physics, Nature's sister journal!

Year-End Party for International Students  A research achievement by Dr. Harutoshi Asakawa, Assistant Professor of the Crystal Engineering Laboratory, Applied Chemistry in Engineering at the Graduate School of Sciences and Technology for Innovation, has been introduced in "Research Highlights" in Nature Physics, Nature's sister journal.
 He studied the behavior of water films (Fig. 2) on ice surfaces formed below the melting point (0°C) under various water vapor pressures, using a special optical microscope (Fig. 1) which is able to detect one-molecular height (0.37nm) on ice surfaces. As a result, they found that the two types of water films on ice surfaces are formed not by the melting of the ice, but by the deposition of water vapor. In the conventional picture, it had been thought that these water films are formed by "surface melting," where the ice melts. However, this research achievement turned the long-believed "surface melting" picture on its head (Fig. 3).
 This achievement was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (impact factor: 9.7; PNAS, 113 (7), 1749-1753, 2016), and was also selected by Nature Physics, sister journal of Nature, to have its abstract printed in "Research Highlights." (Nature Physics, 12 (3), 201, 2016)
 Such liquid films are also observed on metal crystals, semiconductor crystals, organic crystals, etc. Hence, these findings are expected to contribute to the elucidation of interface phenomena which occur just below the melting points of these crystal materials.
Article URL:
http://www.pnas.org/content/113/7/1749.full?sid=427f55bd-b95a-4b00-96be-84b27d45a630
Figure 1. A laser confocal microscope combined with differential interference contrast microscope, which can visualize one-molecular height (0.37nm) on ice surfaces.
Figure 2. Thin layers and droplets covering an ice surface.
Figure 3. Relation between the appearance of the two types of water films and water vapor pressure. This achievement is shown on the left, and the conventional picture is also shown on the right. Under high water vapor pressure, thin layers and droplets appeared (A). With decreasing water vapor pressure, the thin layers first disappeared (B), and then droplets disappeared under low supersaturation conditions (C).


Professor Masaaki Ishikawa of the Graduate School of Sciences and Technology for Innovation has won the 2016 Outstanding Paper Award of the Institute of Systems, Control and Information Engineers!

Year-End Party for International Students  At the 60th Lecture Meeting of the Institute of Systems, Control and Information Engineers, held on Thursday, May 26, Professor Masaaki Ishikawa of the Graduate School of Sciences and Technology for Innovation won and was awarded the 2016 Outstanding Paper Award of the Institute of Systems, Control and Information Engineer.
 This Outstanding Paper Award is awarded to the authors of papers published in Transactions of the Institute of Systems, Control and Information Engineers in the last two years which make a significant contribution in terms of scholarship and technology. The title of the paper is, "On the Bifurcation Analysis of the Stochastic Predator-prey System based on the D-bifurcation."
 The paper discusses the stochastic bifurcation of a predator-prey system, and has clarified the impact of random noise on bifurcation phenomena. A bifurcation phenomenon is a phenomenon in which a variation in parameters causes changes in the qualitative properties of a system. Thanks to this research, it has become possible to analyze the impact of noise on bifurcations in predator-prey systems, and the way has been opened to analysis of the impact of environmental changes on food chains, etc. These points received high recognition as outstanding research which will contribute to the development of the systems, control and information fields.
 Expressing his joy at having received the award, Professor Ishikawa spoke of his passion for his own research: "I am absolutely delighted that the path of my research over the last 40 years, which has been devoted to stochastic systems theory, has been recognized in this way. Generally, we picture noise as an unwanted nuisance, but it also has many useful properties. This research has clarified one of these. I believe that our lives, too, become all the richer in humanity when we falter as a result of noise. So, I will continue to conduct research while cherishing noise."

Previous Topic

(Update:July 01 2016)